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About the data

In data for the United States, The Times is now including cases and deaths that have been identified by public health officials as probable coronavirus patients. Some states and counties only report figures in which a coronavirus infection was confirmed through testing. Because confirmed cases are widely considered to be an undercount of the true toll, some state and local governments have started identifying probable cases and deaths using criteria that were developed by states and the federal government.

Confirmed cases and deaths are counts of individuals whose coronavirus infections were confirmed by a laboratory test. Probable cases and deaths count individuals who did not have a confirmed test but were evaluated using criteria developed by national and local governments. Some governments are reporting only confirmed cases, while others are reporting both confirmed and probable numbers. And there is also another set of governments that are reporting the two types of numbers combined without providing a way to separate the confirmed from the probable. The Times is now using the total of confirmed and probable counts when they are available individually or combined. Otherwise only the confirmed count will be shown.

Governments often revise data or report a large increase in cases on a single day without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.

Read more about the methodology and download county-level data for coronavirus cases in the United States from The New York Times on GitHub.

Timeline of Events

  • On January 31, HHS declared Coronavirus a Public Health Emergency in the US
    As of Jan. 31, the Wuhan coronavirus is officially a public health emergency in the United States, Alex Azar, secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), announced at a White House press briefing.
  • On Jan. 31, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a federal quarantine for 14 days affecting the 195 American evacuees from Wuhan, China. Starting Sunday, Feb. 2, U.S. citizens, permanent residents and immediate family who have visited China’s Hubei province will undergo a mandatory 14 days quarantine and, if they have visited other parts of China, they would be screened at airports and asked to self-quarantine for 14 days. The last time the CDC had issued a quarantine was over 50 years ago in the 1960s, for smallpox.
  • President Donald Trump signed an order on Jan. 31 for the U.S. to deny entry to foreign nationals who traveled to China within the preceding two weeks, aside from the immediate family of U.S. citizens.
  • On Jan. 30, the CDC had confirmed the first case of person to person transmission in the U.S.: [] the husband of the Chicago, Illinois case who had returned from Wuhan, China on Jan. 13 and who tested positive for the virus on Jan. 24).
  • CDC stated on Jan. 30 that «It is likely there will be more cases of 2019-nCoV reported in the U.S. in the coming days and weeks, including more person-to-person spread.»[]
  • The virus had been confirmed in 5 states.
  • On Jan. 31, New York City health officials vehemently denied the rumor regarding a coronavirus case in the city .[]. On Feb. 1, however, the city’s health commissioner did report that there was a test being performed on a person under 40 who had returned from China, developed matching symptoms, and tested negative to the seasonal flu.
  • Most US patients had recently visited Wuhan.
  • All of the first five U.S. cases were described as mild.
  • A study on the first US case of novel coronavirus detailed mild symptoms followed by pneumonia

U.S. Airlines suspended ALL flights between the U.S. and China

On Friday, January 31, Delta, American and United announced they would temporarily suspend all of their mainland China flights in response to the coronavirus outbreak.[]

Prior to this January 31 announcement:

  • UNITED AIRLINES
    on Jan. 28 had announced it would cut 24 flights between the U.S. and China for the first week of February.
  • AMERICAN AIRLINES
    on Jan. 29 had announced it would suspend flights from Los Angeles to Shanghai and Beijing from Feb. 9 through March 27, 2020. It will maintain its flight schedules (10 daily A/R) from Dallas-Fort Worth to Shanghai and Beijing, as well as from Los Angeles and Dallas-Fort Worth to Hong Kong.
  • DELTA had not adjusted its schedule of direct flights from the U.S. to China. It is the only airline with direct flights to not take action so far.

[]

Travel Alert: Do Not Travel to China

  • The U.S. State Department on January 30 issued a Level 4: Do Not Travel to China Alert [] (the highest level of alert).
  • Previously, on January 29, the advisory was set at a lower «Level 3: Reconsider Travel» advising not to travel to Hubei Province: (Level 4) and reconsider travel to the remainder of China (Level 3).
  • The CDC on Jan. 28 issued a Level 3 Warning, recommending that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to China [].

Screening incoming passengers at 20 airports in the U.S.

On January 17, the CDC announced that 3 airports in the United States would begin screening incoming passengers from China: SFO, JFK, and LAX [] Other 2 airports were added subsequently, and on January 28, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that 15 additional U.S. airports (bringing the total to 20) would begin screening incoming travelers from China.

Below is the complete list of airports where screening for the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is in place:

  • Los Angeles International (LAX)
  • San Francisco International (SFO)
  • Chicago O’Hare
  • New York JFK
  • Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International
  • Houston George Bush Intercontinental 
  • Dallas-Fort Worth International
  • San Diego International
  • Seattle-Tacoma International
  • Honolulu International
  • Anchorage Ted Stevens International
  • Minneapolis-St. Paul International
  • Detroit Metropolitan
  • Miami International
  • Washington Dulles International
  • Philadelphia International
  • Newark Liberty International
  • Boston Logan International
  • El Paso International
  • Puerto Rico’s San Juan Airport

How many people have ever lived on earth?

Assuming that we start counting from about 50,000 B.C., the time when modern Homo sapiens appeared on the earth (and not from 700,000 B.C. when the ancestors of Homo sapiens appeared, or several million years ago when hominids were present), taking into account that all population data are a rough estimate, and assuming a constant growth rate applied to each period up to modern times, it has been estimated that a total of approximately 106 billion people have been born since the dawn of the human species, making the population currently alive roughly 6% of all people who have ever lived on planet Earth.

Others have estimated the number of human beings who have ever lived to be anywhere from 45 billion to 125 billion, with most estimates falling into the range of 90 to 110 billion humans.

World Population by Region

# Region Population(2020) YearlyChange NetChange Density(P/Km²) Land Area(Km²) Migrants(net) Fert.Rate Med.Age UrbanPop % WorldShare
1 Asia 4,641,054,775 0.86 % 39,683,577 150 31,033,131 -1,729,112 2.2 32 0 % 59.5 %
2 Africa 1,340,598,147 2.49 % 32,533,952 45 29,648,481 -463,024 4.4 20 0 % 17.2 %
3 Europe 747,636,026 0.06 % 453,275 34 22,134,900 1,361,011 1.6 43 0 % 9.6 %
4 Latin America and the Caribbean 653,962,331 0.9 % 5,841,374 32 20,139,378 -521,499 2 31 0 % 8.4 %
5 Northern America 368,869,647 0.62 % 2,268,683 20 18,651,660 1,196,400 1.8 39 0 % 4.7 %
6 Oceania 42,677,813 1.31 % 549,778 5 8,486,460 156,226 2.4 33 0 % 0.5 %
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